MAZEPPA by Tchaikovsky
"If it at first it seemed a little foolhardy to mount such a big work on a small scale, any doubts were quickly laid to rest right from the opening women's chorus. You could just sit back, forget the spectacle and concentrate on Tchaikovsky's luscious vocal writing."

Wayne Gooding, OPERA CANADA

2013-2014 SEASON

THE STRESSED-OUT IMPRESARIO
Sunday, October 6, 2013


BENJAMIN BRITTEN
GLORIANA
Sunday, November 24, 2013


JEAN PHILIPPE RAMEAU
HIPPOLYTE et ARICIE
Sunday, February 2, 2014


GIUSEPPE VERDI
STIFFELIO
Sunday, March 23, 2014

 

 

The upcoming 2013-2014 season showcases some 'rarities of performance' and features Gloriana by Benjamin Britten, Rameau's Hippolyte et Aricie, and Verdi's Stiffelio, along with a special performance of The Stressed-Out Impresario, based on Mozart's one-act satire.

Image: Sylvie Bélanger, Le double_ portrait, 2001 (detail). Courtesy the artist and Birch Libralato

 

JEAN PHILIPPE RAMEAU
HIPPOLYTE et ARICIE

Sunday, February 2, 2014— 2:30pm
in french with english surtitles

250th commemorative anniversary of rameau's death.

The opera’s main characters are all taken from classic Greek mythology. Hippolyte is the son of Theseus, the legendary founding king of Athens and the stepson of Phaedra, Theseus’ second wife. Hippolyte is in love with Aricie. Theseus has taken her captive, and she and Hippolyte have fallen in love. The innocence of Hippolyte is tragically revealed only after his perceived death and Phaedra’s demise.

With Kevin Mallon and the Aradia Ensemble.

Featuring
Kevin Mallon, Conductor
Aradia Ensemble, Orchestra
Guillermo Silva-Marin, Dramatic Advisor

Colin Ainsworth as Hippolyte
Meredith Hall as Aricie
Allyson McHardy as Phèdre
Alain Coulombe as Thésée
Max van Wyck as Pluton
Edward Larocque as Mercure
Benjamin Covey as Tisiphone
Vania Chan as Une Bergère / Une Chasseresse / Diane
Keenan Viau as 1st Parque
Janaka Welihinda as 2nd Parque
Domenico Sanfilippo as 3rd Parque

SYNOPSIS

PROLOGUE
Diana, chaste goddess of the moon and the hunt, and Cupid, god of love, argue over who will dominate. Their quarrel is settled by Jupiter, who decrees that love will rule over all hearts for one day every year. Diana vows to protect the mortals Hippolyte and Aricie.

ACT I
Hippolyte is in love with a young woman, Aricie, the daughter of Pallas, the enemy of his father Theseus (Thésée), King of Athens. Pallas compels Aricie to take a vow of chastity to Diana. Before she does so, Hippolyte reveals his love for Aricie and Diana promises to protect the couple. This enrages Phaedra (Phèdre), Queen of Athens, who harbours an illicit love for Hippolyte, her stepson. News arrives that her husband Theseus is dead. Phaedra may now pursue her passion for Hippolyte and offer him the crown of Athens.

ACT II
Neptune, father of Theseus, has promised to answer his son's prayers three times during his life. Theseus's first prayer is to reach Hades safely, where he hopes to rescue his friend Pirithous. Theseus fights with the Fury Tisiphone, but successfully reaches Pluto's court. Pluto condemns Theseus to share the fate of his friend Pirithous, but allows him a trial. When Theseus loses, he prays a second time to Neptune, and Pluto is powerless to hold him. As Theseus is leaving, however, the Furies (Les Parques) predict that though he may leave Hades, he will find Hell in his own home.

ACT III
Phaedra meets Hippolyte, who offers her his condolences on the death of Theseus. Mistaking his concern for love, Phaedra confesses her passion to him. Hippolyte is shocked and curses her. Phaedra tries to kill herself but Hippolyte prevents it. Theseus arrives unexpectedly. Unsure what to make of the scene, he accuses Hippolyte of trying to rape Phaedra. Phaedra rushes off and Hippolyte nobly refuses to denounce his stepmother. Theseus decides to use his last prayer to Neptune to punish Hippolyte.

ACT IV
Hippolyte and Aricie have escaped together to Diana's realm. A monster suddenly emerges from the sea to punish Hippolyte. He tries to fight it and is defeated. Phaedra confesses her guilt for Hippolyte's death.

ACT V
Theseus learns the truth from Phaedra, who takes her own life. Theseus too threatens suicide but Neptune reveals that Hippolyte is still alive, thanks to Diana's protection. But for unjustly blaming his son, Theseus is condemned never to see him again.

In Diana's realm, the goddess reunites Hippolyte and Aricie.